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Return to: Smoke Alarm Part 1, Smoke Part 2 Carbon Monoxide, Fire Escape Plans, Fire Extinguishers, Fire Sprinklers  

Smoke Detectors SAVE LIVES

LANDLORDS TENANTS AND HOMEOWNERS PLEASE READ

Our lead topic for our February 2007 newsletter is the result of a press release on SMOKE DETECTORS received from the International Association of Fire Chiefs which begins:

The International Association of Fire Chiefs is pleading with the media to help us inform the public of the high number of house fires with fatalities that have occurred since the beginning of February. “We have lost too many people in home fires in the last two weeks,” said President Chief Jim Harmes. “Last night, six were killed in a house fire in Louisiana, two in house fires in Tennessee and one in my own community in Grand Blanc, Michigan. It is mid-February('07) and by media reports, 59 people in the U.S. have perished in house fires in 17 states since the beginning of this month. We have got to do something,” said Harmes. 

Right before this email, a resident a few miles down the road was critically burned in an early morning fire. The Heroics of a neighbor (with a fire extinguisher) and the fire department have, so far, saved this person's life.

We then gathered some more information  on Smoke Detectors, Fire Sprinklers, Carbon Monoxide Fire Extinguishers and Fire Escape plans to remind all we can.. If we can reach just ONE resident – we did good.  

Every year nearly 4,000 Americans die in home fires and approximately 20,000 are injured. Children and the elderly are especially at risk in home fires because they are less able to escape when fire strikes. There are approximately 500 CO (Carbon Monoxide) fatalities annually, and many more persons suffer flu-like symptoms from CO exposure. You can improve the chances that your family will survive a home fire or CO leak by installing smoke and CO alarms and knowing what to do if they sound.

THERE ARE MANY LAWS IN EVERY STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT THAT REQUIRE AT LEAST ONE SMOKE DETECTOR IN EVERY HOME. THEY MUST BE LOCATED IN THE BEDROOM AREA.  IF YOU RENT, YOUR LANDLORD SHOULD HAVE SUPPLIED YOU WITH ONE. YOU SHOULD TAKE THE RESPONSIBILITY TO MAKE SURE THE ALARM IS WORKING. MANY LAWS ALSO REQUIRE A CARBON MONOXIDE DETECTOR.

SMOKE DETECTOR Helpful Tip : Pick a holiday or your birthday and replace the batteries each year on that day.

For those that don’t have the patience to read more, see these tips:

  • Check smoke and carbon monoxide alarms to be sure they are working properly.

    • Change the batteries every 6 months or on a special day – your birthday for example.

  • Have an escape plan with a meeting place.  An escape plan is a “what-if”  plan – if there is a fire how do I get out – can I?  Read more.

  • Once you exit your home, DO NOT return. Too many people lose their lives going back into a burning home.  Wait for help.

  • Stoves are not made for heating homes.  Carbon Monoxide will kill you. Read more.

  • Supplemental heating devices should be used and maintained in accordance with manufacturer recommendations. Keep combustibles clear. Do not leave supplemental heating devices unattended.

  • If you are burning wood in your fireplace, make sure your chimneys are properly maintained. You can die from a chimney fire or from Carbon Monoxide. That goes for your furnace, as well.

  • If candles are necessary, use them in a safe environment in a fireproof container and away from children. Do not leave them unattended.  Better yet – do not burn candles. Do not fall asleep with candles next to your bed. Many people have died when they rolled over and a blanket caught on fire.

  • If you are a tenant and are renting your home, check your fire alarm. Make sure you have at least one or more. Your landlord may not do it. DO NOT WAIT.

  • If you need a smoke detector or carbon monoxide detector and do not have the money for one, contact your local fire department. There are many, many programs to help the poor and elderly.

  • If you buy a smoke detector, INSTALL IT. It will do nothing other then melt in it’s packaging. If you need help getting it installed, contact your local fire department for assistance. They MIGHT be able to help.

  • DO NOT REMOVE THE SMOKE DETECTOR OR BATTERIES FROM THE WALLS OR CEILINGS.

  • When in doubt, call a neighbor, a friend, the fire department or your landlord for help maintaining or installing a smoke detector or carbon monoxide detector.

To many people “can’t stand the noise” and rip them off.

And for the long term, consider getting a residential fire sprinkler. According to statistics, the risk of death by fire is reduced by 82 percent (97 percent survival rate) when smoke detectors are accompanied with residential fire sprinklers.

Return to: Smoke Alarm Part 1, Smoke Part 2 Carbon Monoxide, Fire Escape Plans, Fire Extinguishers, Fire Sprinklers  

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